Question

Homeless children and youth report that school is a home to them – a place where they see the same faces, sit in the same seat, and can put their hearts and minds into pursuits that ease their daily troubles. In school, students gain the skills and support needed to avoid poverty and homelessness as adults.

Publications

For additional information, including resources from other organizations, visit the topic pages below:

Early Childhood | Higher Education | Housing Special Education | The McKinney-Vento Act | Title I, Part A | Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

NCHE Publications

National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE)
NCHE is the U.S. Department of Education's information and technical assistance center for the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program. NCHE provides a variety of free products and resources to the national homeless education and service provider communities. These resources include a comprehensive website, a toll-free homeless education helplinea homeless education listserv, educational rights posters, parent booklets, a Local Homeless Education Liaison Toolkit, a state homeless education contact directory, and more.

NAEHCY Publications

The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations - Updated September 2016
Refreshed and revised, this publication covers a wide spectrum of education issues concerning homeless children and youth, from child care and early education services to higher education policies. It includes questions and answers that clarify recent amendments made by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 to the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and Title I Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the U.S. Department of Education’s Non-Regulatory Guidance, Head Start Performance Standards, and the U.S. Department of Education’s financial aid policies.  A detailed index has also been added.
Download The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations

A Critical Moment: Child and Youth Homelessness in Our Nation's Schools
The economic downturn has forced more families and youth to lose their footing, falling downward into the spiral of homelessness and jeopardizing children and youth’s educational success. At the same time, a one-time increase in federal funding for school-based efforts to identify and support homeless children and youth has enabled more school districts to provide more assistance. The ability of schools to continue to provide this assistance, however, hinges on current budget decisions. This brief summarizes recent federal data, as well as findings from a national survey of school districts and state departments of education.
Download A Critical Moment: Child and Youth Homelessness in Our Nation's Schools

College Access and Success for Students Experiencing Homelessness: A Toolkit for Educators and Service Providers
This toolkit serves as a comprehensive resource on the issue of higher education access and success for homeless students, including information on understanding homeless students, assisting homeless students in choosing a school, helping homeless students pay for application-related expenses, assisting homeless students in finding financial aid and scholarships for school, and helping homeless students succeed in college.
Download C
ollege Access and Success for Students Experiencing Homelessness: A Toolkit for Educators and Service Providers

The Economic Crisis Hits Home: The Unfolding Increase In Child and Youth Homelessness
Largely due to the economic and housing crises, many school districts across the country report increases in the number of homeless students in the classroom. The Economic Crisis Hits Home presents the results of a survey of local homeless education liaisons conducted by the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY) and First Focus between October 24 and December 10, 2008. Based on these findings, the report also presents policy recommendations for the new Administration and Congress, as well as practice recommendations for schools and community agencies.
Download The Economic Crisis Hits Home: The Unfolding Increase In Child and Youth Homelessness

Housing + High School = Success. Schools and Communities Uniting to House Unaccompanied Youth
This publication provides a step-by-step guide and practical tools to create four different temporary housing models for unaccompanied youth: host homes; group homes; independent living; and emergency shelters. The steps are designed to give readers tools to establish these programs in their communities and include sample youth applications, host home applications, powers of attorney, parental consent forms, confidentiality notices, job descriptions, posters, flyers, Power Point presentations, data collection tools, and other useful forms and documents.
Visit the Housing + High School = Success webpage

Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief, co-authored by NAEHCY and Kids In Need of Defense (KIND), is designed for young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons, and other educators. It provides information about federal laws that provide the means for undocumented unaccompanied youth who are homeless to attend school and address their immigration status.
Download Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Making State Laws Work for Unaccompanied Youth: A How-To Manual and Tools for Creating State Laws and Policies to Support Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Under Age 18
As McKinney-Vento liaisons, youth service providers, attorneys and others work to assist unaccompanied homeless youth, they often are limited by state and federal laws that do not provide youth with adequate rights. This publication provides practical tools and strategies to help youth and advocates create state and local laws and policies to support unaccompanied homeless youth.
Download Making State Laws Work for Unaccompanied Youth: A How-To Manual and Tools for Creating State Laws and Policies to Support Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Under Age 18

Strategies for Implementing New HUD Homeless Assistance Requirements to Collaborate with Schools
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) leads the federal government's efforts to prevent and end homelessness. The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act, signed into law in 2009, provides for the prevention of homelessness, rapid re-housing, consolidation of housing programs, and new homeless categories. The HEARTH Act also includes four educational assurances requiring collaboration between HUD-funded homeless service programs and school districts. These requirements, and suggestions for implementing them, are described in this NAEHCY document.
Download Strategies for Implementing HUD Homeless Assistance Requirements to Collaborate with Schools

Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Toolkits
NAEHCY is pleased to offer this set of three unaccompanied homeless youth toolkits. Each toolkit, designed with a specific audience in mind, contains a wealth of information about supporting unaccompanied youth in school and out, with a special focus on helping unaccompanied youth complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) when applying for aid for higher education. A toolkit is available for each of the following audiences:

Using What We Know: Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
This report presents seven principles for educational success for unaccompanied youth and detailed, practical strategies to implement those principles in schools and communities. Distilled from interviews with over one hundred NAEHCY members from across the country, each principle is based on what we know as educators and advocates dedicated to the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness: that to confront the educational challenges of unaccompanied young people, we must confront homelessness.
Download Using What We Know: Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

NAEHCY 2017 Conference
Chicago, IL
October 28-31, 2017
The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015
Homeless Students in ESEA Reauthorization
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